4/4/08

Gamble Garden

After visiting Emma's garden, and the Eleanor Community Garden, we went to the Gamble Garden.

Gamble Garden (Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden (Palo Alto, CA)

Big spring plant sales coming up soon, everywhere.

IMG_5419

(Light brown apple moth quarantine--lots of drama going on.)

They have Echium wildpretii for sale.

Gamble Garden plant sale (Palo Alto, CA)

And lots of own-root roses.

Gamble Garden plant sale (Palo Alto, CA)

These irises naturalize readily (too readily?) in California gardens.

Gamble Garden plant sale (Palo Alto, CA)

Flat after flat of interesting succulents.

Gamble Garden plant sale (Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden plant sale (Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden plant sale (Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden (Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden (Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden (Palo Alto, CA)

Agave parrsana.

Agave parrsana (Gamble Garden; Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden (Palo Alto, CA)

Echium wildpretii in the...orchard. Well, why not. Gamble has an extensive collection of espaliered apple and pear trees.

Echium wildpretii and apple espalier! (Gamble Garden; Palo Alto, CA)

And a large cutting garden.

Delphinium (Palo Alto, CA)

Delphinium (Palo Alto, CA)

Digitalis (Gamble Garden; Palo Alto, CA)

And big vegetable beds.

Pea (Gamble Garden; Palo Alto, CA)

Rubus.

Rubus (Gamble Garden; Palo Alto, CA)

Wildflowers are blooming in the native garden outside the garden gate. This is Phacelia tanacetifolia.

Phacelia tanacetifolia (Gamble Garden, Palo Alto, CA)

Gamble Garden entry (Palo Alto, CA)

I've been here once before. It was winter then and I had a hard time relating. I'm still having a hard time relating to the garden's particular logic, but there's a lot more to see and in spring than winter.

12 comments:

gintoino said...

Wow! Beautiful succulents. And that Echium wildpretii....I have to get some seeds of that! Do you know the name of that yellow flower that comes between the succulents pictures?

chuck b. said...

It's some kind of poppy, but I don't know the name.

Blackswamp_Girl said...

What logic is it that you have trouble relating to? The echiums in the orchard kind of logic?

(Just curious. I like to pick people's brains, and all that.)

Beautiful garden, and all of those succulents.. they would get me into trouble. The easter bunny topiary I could happily leave instead of take, however.

chuck b. said...

Inside, it's all laid out in rows. Row upon monotonous row. The plants in the rows are nice, but I think beds matter. This is a garden that's designed with gardening efficiency foremost in mind. I do not know anything about gardening efficiently. Is it joyful?

chuck b. said...

Oh, and then in the rows, plants are placed next to other plants with no rhyme or reason. A bed of delphinium next to a bed of hebe next to a bed of daisies. Why?

JvA said...

The Ceanothus in the distance in that last shot is so beautiful it makes my heart ache.

chuck b. said...

You are so pregnant.

JvA said...

I swear to God, I was more sentimental before getting pregnant. Now I'm more vulgar.

lisa said...

Okay, this post has me salivating....both for the amazing succulents that I always need more of, and the generally phallic quality to your pictures...you know how it is! ;-)

Blackswamp_Girl said...

Ah... I think I get it. So if it were not quite understandable, but in that way that you feel some kind of magic going on, it would be okay. But the magic is missing, and it's all not helped by the utilitarianism of the layout?

chuck b. said...

It's a garden of very successful plants, but very utilitarian and charmless.

It's pretty. But not beautiful.

I hope no one at the Gamble Garden ever finds this blog post.

Lori said...

Yeah, I'm not wowed by the garden design here, and there's far too much super-exciting mulch to look at, but it's interesting to me to see so many unfamiliar plants. Do you know what the blue-flowering bush is in the last picture?