5/9/09

Eleanor Pardee Community Gardens in Palo Alto, CA

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I guess some people see this garden and think, "What a waste. How inefficient. This space could be so much more productive."

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I suppose some people would have a point. After all, does the world really need more sweet peas? Sweet peas are lovely, but people can't eat them.

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In an age of "global warming, depleted fossil fuels, and disease", shouldn't we be working together in the garden instead of doing our own thing?

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With a comprehensive plan and division of labor, this place could be cooking with gas.

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I suppose if that's what you want, it's fine for you.

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I, however, will opt out.

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Unless and until we're talking about an immediate and serious crisis, I'd rather do my own thing.

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For starters, I'll be looking at the flowers.

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One immediate and serious crisis that I'm totally down with is the drought. I'm all over the regionally appropriate ornamentation.

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5 comments:

Les said...

That post on Garden Rant was a little scarey. I think one of the great things about traditional community gardens is thier diversity and how they organically evolve over time. What Ed was recommending reminds me of the State Farm here in Virginia where inmates at one of the penitentiaries produce the food used in many of the penal kitchens.

Christopher C. NC said...

Even flowers will be neccesary in the garden when and if doom and gloom should arrive.

Frances said...

Flowers are needed to attract the pollinators that food crops need. I hope not to live long enough to see every action by humans as having to only be for the good of the community. Now those were some roses!
Frances

Annie in Austin said...

Oh, Chuck! I read that GR post and all the comments and it freaked me out, too. I love vegetable gardens but some of the vegetable garden advocates are a grim lot, indeed.

Where are the moral judgements for other public land activities like golf or swimming or little league baseball? Maybe that will come next - with a committee sent out to measure the muscle mass of joggers to make sure they're using the community property to good advantage.

It probably won't happen, since only gardeners' souls seem to be weighed on the scale of Osiris - but my taxes pay for the land used by those other activities, whether or not they produce anything tangible...or edible.

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

myallforjc said...

This is wonderful. I am looking forward to 2006 and following. Thanks for your blog, I always look forward to reading it!