10/6/08

Do you like this?

"Patrick Dougherty is a sculptor who uses tree saplings as his construction material. He began with small pieces on pedestals and his work eventually, er, grew into massive installations that require truckloads of saplings." Via.

8 comments:

Les, Zone 8a said...

Yes I do!

outofdoors said...

yep, generally speaking. especially the one with the empty-headed beast humping a stairwell. but i like it better when the withies are planted, so living metamorphosis occurs, as opposed to watching plant material decay...

chuck b. said...

That's kind of how I felt. Sort of ecstatic, but with a bummed out, sad feeling too.

Jim/ArtofGardening said...

If I hadn't lost most of my retirement in the last week, I'd have commissioned him to build me a tree made of twigs.

Frances said...

Hi Chuck, I have mixed feelings too, but not over sadness for the saplings. Trees can be weeds, just like dandelions or even crabgrass. They are a major weed here, even desirable trees like dogwoods, millions, well lots of them shooting up all over. It was the smoldering comment in the article that was scary to me. Like bonfires waiting to happen. There was an installation at the University of Tennessee's bloom day in the children's garden this summer. Large caves, tables and buildings made from trimmings, to be composted later. They are not meant to last long. Like A. Goldworthy.

Annie in Austin said...

Thanks for the link, Chuck,

I liked the ones at New Harmony in the alternate snow photo - then read Frances' comment and the comments at the article and decided that being set into a field of snow may be the safest environment for them!

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

lisa said...

Yes...I DO like it. Very much. He should build the burning man every year...forever. He could build some structures for me, and if I plant vines and earthen roofs it would be really exciting!

Jenn said...

Oh, yes. He did an installation at the Desert Botanical Garden.

Fantastic landscape, and the juxtaposition with desert was fascinating.

In our area, that type of structure is a return to native dwellings. The Hohokom used twig structures over shallow digs for their housing.

Nothing new in the world, but how we see a thing.